A Mini History Lesson In Cebu

Cebu City, known as the “Queen City of the South,” is the oldest city in the Philippines. Travelers here can see relics from the pre-Christian days of the Philippines and ruins of the first Spanish settlement, along side exquisite modern resorts on picturesque island beaches.

Though our time in Cebu city was short, I feel like my mind was given a treasure chest of historical knowledge. There is just something I love about old cities and the stories they can tell you if you listen to the old ruins beckoning to you through the pulsating beat of the modern city around it.

 

One of the most visited sights in Cebu is Magellan’s Cross, which is said to have been planted by Ferdinand Magellan when he first landed in the Philippines in 1521. It is a symbol of the influence of the strong Christian Faith in the Philippines.

Cross of Magellan circa 1521
Cross of Magellan circa 1521

phillippines 015

 

The Basilica Minore del Santo Nino which was the first church established in the Philippines is just a few steps away from the Cross of Magellan. It houses the country’s oldest religious relic: The figure of the Holy Child of Cebu. This figure, adorned with gold and precious jewels,was given as a gift from Magellan to the wife of Rajah Humabon (ruler of Cebu at the time of Magellan).  It is said that after a fire that destroyed much of the village, a soldier found the statue in a burned down out house miraculously unscathed and untouched by the fire. Every year in January, Santo Nino is honored during the Sinulog festival which celebrates the Philippine’s pagan past and conversion to Christianity.

phillippines2 224

phillippines2 225

Getting our own Santo Nino to take home!
Getting our own Santo Nino to take home!
Remnants of the Sinulog Festival. Superman, Wonder Woman, and Spider Man were special guests!
Remnants of the Sinulog Festival. Superman, Wonder Woman, and Spider Man were special guests!

 

Lapu Lapu, ruler of Mactan island in the Cebu region of the Philippines circa 1521, is regarded as the first Filipino hero. He was the first native to resist Spanish colonization and was responsible for the death of Magellan.

lapulapu

phillippines2 244

 

Not far from Lapu Lapu’s statue is the beautiful 5 star Shangri-la Mactan Hotel Resort and Spa. Though we did not get to stay here, it was still a nice place to walk around, enjoy the scenery and have a nice lunch.

photo-12

photo-13

photo-15photo-14

The Taoist Temple built by the island’s significant Chinese population is an interesting little side stop. It offers visitors a library, chapel, souvenir shop, wishing well, and beautiful views overlooking Cebu City.

phillippines2 268

Don’t forget to stop at the Casa Gorordo Museum when visiting Cebu. Locally called “Bahay na Bato, ” (house of stone) this house was built out of coral stone blocks, molave hardwood flooring, and terra-cotta roof tiles in the mid 19 century. It is located in what was once the most prestigious section of the city during the Spanish colonial times. Displayed inside the museum are beautiful antique furniture, period costumes, paintings and religious relics, wood carvings, decorative art and household items. There is also a gallery for contemporary art on the ground floor.

phillippines2 227phillippines2 230

 

I would love to visit Cebu again if I ever get the chance. There is so much rich Filipino history waiting for you to discover in that beautiful old city.

phillippines2 242

 

 

Advertisements

Posted by

Jamie is a writer with a passion for adventure, history, and more. When she’s not out exploring the world, Jamie is at home in sunny San Diego, CA chasing sunsets and carne asada fries, preoccupied with research, or invested in a good book and a cup of tea.

One thought on “A Mini History Lesson In Cebu

  1. I love old Catholic churches and the history that it carries. This blog is so well written that it transformed me not only to Cebu City but to the time that the events were happening. Keep travelling and thank you for sharing.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s